2011 Distinguished Alumni Seminar

Celebrating the "International Year of Forests 2011"

May 6, 2011

University of Washington
Anderson 207, Lockwood Forest Club Room, 2– 4 p.m.
Reception to follow.
Video Presentations

Panel Presentation
"If I Could Change the World: Forestry and Environmental Issues in
South Sudan, Africa; Asia; and South America”

Program Moderator: Mack Hogans ('76)

 

Jeannette Gurung ('85) is a forester and gender and development expert whose career has focused on leading organizational change for gender equality within agriculture and natural resource management organizations in Asia and Africa. She is founder and Executive Director of Women Organizing for Change in Agriculture and Natural Resource Management (WOCAN), a global network of over 750 professionals in 93 countries who are committed to increasing rural women’s access to and control over resources to manage agriculture and natural resources to enhance their livelihoods.  WOCAN engages in advocacy and capacity building for women’s leadership and organization change through an innovative approach of partnering women farmers with professionals, and building the support of men in the process.

Click to view Adobe Flash video presentationVideo Presentation

Kamoji Wachiira ('69) has over 25 years of experience in international development in Africa, South Asia, and the Caribbean, principally in environment and natural resource management. His field experience with the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) includes designing and monitoring projects in the Horn of Africa, serving as Head of Aid for Guyana and Suriname, and as Lead Specialist for the Canadian Climate Change Fund responsible for greenhouse gas mitigation/ carbon sequestration projects in Indonesia, Philippines, and Thailand. While a Senior Fellow at the Consensus Building Institute (CBI), his responsibilities included training in negotiation and mediation, and research on dispute management in conflict resolution. For CBI, he conducted a conflict assessment field survey in Somaliland and the northern Somalia autonomous region, a highly contested, post-conflict setting. He has served as adviser on global environmental issues to Dr. Wangari Maathai, the 2004 Nobel Peace Laureate and long-time colleague and fellow advocate for the environment and human rights in Africa, and was the senior consultant on the production team of the documentary on the Green Belt Movement: "Taking Root: the Vision of Wangari Maathai."

Click to view Adobe Flash video presentationVideo Presentation

 

Mark Wishnie ('98) is a founding partner and Managing Director of Equator, LLC, an integrated environmental commodity and timberland management company based in New York City and São Paulo, Brazil. Under his leadership, Equator has grown to become the largest independent timberland manager in Brazil, where the company manages approximately 250,000 acres of forestlands for the production of timber and biofuel. Prior to joining Equator, Mark served for six years as Director of the Native Species Reforestation Project at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in the Republic of Panama, and also served as Acting Director of the Smithsonian’s Center for Tropical Forest Science, a pan-tropical network of 17 long-term forest ecology research sites located in 14 countries tropical Africa, Asia, and Latin America. He has also served as Program Director at the Yale Tropical Resources Institute, and has consulted on forestry and natural resources issues to the Alaska Department of Natural Resources, North and Latin American forestry companies and universities, and two statewide Alaskan political campaigns.

Click to view Adobe Flash video presentationVideo Presentation

Intended as a bridge for students (from the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences and across campus) by helping them to understand and appreciate the kind of real world work and roles they can assume after they have completed a SEFS program and engage in full time employment, the Distinguished Alumni Seminars are also open to the UW community and the public. The series provides a welcome home to distinguished alumni and an opportunity to introduce them to the community. The series showcases alumni who during their careers have been leaders in the private, public, and nongovernmental sectors in the U.S. and abroad.

We are grateful to contributors who have made this seminar series possible: Charles W. Bingham, Mack Hogans, Paul Hylbert, Sr., Carol and Gordon Iverson, Elizabeth and William Meadowcroft, Laurie and Toby Murray, Steven and Connie Rogel, Judy and Gary Shirley, Victoria and Allen Symington, and James and Robin Warjone.




2010 Distinguished Alumni Seminar

2-4 p.m.
University of Washington
Anderson 207, Lockwood Forest Club Room
Reception to follow.

April 23, 2010

“On the Shoulders: An Interdisciplinary Life in Conservation, Science, and Politics”
Dr. Gary Machlis ('75), Professor of Conservation in the University of Idaho's Department of Forest Resources and Science Advisor to the Director, National Park Service. He was instrumental in developing the Park Service's social science program and the Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Unit, which he coordinated from 1998-2006.

The seminar will be followed by a reception, also in Anderson 207.

For a Chronicle of Higher Education article, see Conservation Professor Applies His Science to National Parks.

Books recommended by Gary in his talk :

Daydreams and Nightmares by William R. Burch, Jr
Gravity’s Rainbow by Thomas Pynchon
Sociobiology by E. O. Wilson
The Prince by Niccolo Machiavelli
The Adoption and Diffusion of Innovations by Everett Rogers
The Ecological Transition by John W. Bennett
Climate Change as a Contact Sport by Stephen Schneider
The Audacity of Hope by Barack Obama
The Protest Singer by Alec Wilkinson




2008 Distinguished Alumni Seminar

3:30 – 5 p.m.
University of Washington
Anderson 207, Lockwood Forest Club Room
Reception to follow.

May 6, 2008
poster (pdf)

Panel presentation with alumni:

  • Vicki Christiansen ('83), Executive Director of Regulatory Programs and Washington State Forester, WA Department of Natural Resources.

  • Cassie Phillips ('76), Vice President for Sustainable Forests and Products, Weyerhaeuser Company.
  • The discussion will focus on contrasts, compatabilities, and challenges in managing public and private forest lands in contemporary society.

    As the chief forester for WA-DNR, Vicki will focus on the challenges facing public trust land managers to meet their financial obligations as well as the increasing demand for a broader array of ecosystem services. Cassie will talk about the changing face of private, corporate forestry and the challenges facing companies like Weyerhaueser to remain competitive in a market where operating costs continue to rise, while economic markets are increasingly constrained. Both will share the contrasting nature of their work as forestry executives, as well at those areas where compatibiliies exist. The session promises to be informative, enlightening, and entertaining.

    The seminar will be followed by a reception, also in Anderson 207.

    Intended as a bridge for students (from the School and across campus) by helping them to understand and appreciate the kind of real world work and roles they can assume after they have completed a SEFS program and engage in full time employment, the seminars are also open to the UW community and the public. The series provides a welcome home to the School's distinguished alumni and an opportunity to introduce them to the School community. The series showcases alumni who during their careers have been leaders in the private, public, and nongovernmental sectors in the U.S. and abroad.





    2007 Distinguished Alumni Seminar

    3:30 – 5:30 p.m.
    University of Washington
    Anderson 207, Lockwood Forest Club Room
    Reception to follow.

    February 15, 2007
    “The Road Less Traveled ”

    poster (pdf)

    Panel presentation with
    Michelle Connor ('01), Vice President, Cascade Land Conservancy
    Dan Hinkley ('85), Plantsman and Horticulturalist
    Robert Michael Pyle ('73), Independent Writer and Biologist

    For additional information on these alumni and on the Cascade Land Conservancy, see:
    From Kingston to Nepal, a plant explorer's journey to fame
    Where Eden Could Order Its Plants
    Robert Michael Pyle writes a resounding hymn to a forgotten corner of the state




    2006 Distinguished Alumni Seminar Series

    January 14, 2006
    “Not your Father’s Forestry and Serving a Higher Purpose”
    Panel presentation with Court Stanley (’83), Senior Vice President and Chief Forester, Port Blakely Tree Farms and Sue Joerger (’79), Executive Director, Puget Soundkeeper Alliance
    For information on Port Blakely Tree Farms and the Puget Soundkeeper Alliance see:
    www.pugetsoundkeeper.org
    http://www.portblakely.com/port-blakely-tree-farms/about

    February 24, 2006
    “The World as a Stage” Kenton Miller (’62, ‘63), former Director, World Conservation Union, and former Vice President for Conservation, World Resources Institute

    April 6, 2006
    “Law and (dis) Order”
    Ann Forest Burns ('71), Attorney, Burns & Williams, President, College of Forest Resources Alumni Association

    May 19, 2006
    “Growing the Green in the Big Apple”
    Scot Medbury (’90), President and CEO, Brooklyn Botanic Garden