May 2003
The Straight Grain
Volume 17, Number 4

In this Issue:

- Events
- Conferences
- Community and Outreach
- Centers & Field Sites
- Forestry Issues in the News

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EVENTS
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MONDAY, 2 JUNE
DISSERTATION DEFENSE - Lisa Carlson, 9:30 a.m., Anderson 22
" Describing the postglacial pattern and rate of Picea expansion in Alaska using paleoecological records."

MONDAY, 2 JUNE
THESIS DEFENSE - Tara Goldsmith, 3:00 p.m., Douglas Classroom, CUH.
" Factors affecting population growth and persistence of Wenatchee Mts. checker-mallow (Sidalcea oregana var. calva), a taxon endemic to Chelan County, WA."

TUESDAY, 3 JUNE
SOIL CHEMISTRY SEMINAR - Darlene Zabowski, 3:30-4:30 p.m., Mary Gates 258
" Using soil solution chemistry to understand below ground environmental processes."

TUESDAY, 3 JUNE
CWWS TUESDAY MORNING GET-TOGETHERS - Jim Agee, 8:30 a.m., Anderson 22.
" Up in flames--Riparian zones and fire."

TUESDAY, 3 JUNE
WILDLIFE SCIENCE SEMINAR - Scott Horton, 3:30 p.m., Winkenwerder 231.
" Developing a scientific basis for marbled murrelet conservation on state trust lands in the Olympic Experimental State Forest."

WEDNESDAY, 4 JUNE
THESIS DEFENSE - Heather Rogers, 9:00 a.m., Winkenwerder 107.
" Investigation of alternative fuel removal strategies."

WEDNESDAY, 4 JUNE
THESIS DEFENSE - John Garth, 9:00 a.m., Winkenwerder 105
" Material Substitution Trends in Residential Construction (2001 vs. 1998)."

WEDNESDAY, 4 JUNE
THESIS DEFENSE - Ryan Bidwell, 9:30 a.m., Anderson 22
" Watershed Councils and the Oregon Plan: An analysis of watershed planning processes."

WEDNESDAY, 4 JUNE
CFR 2003 RECOGNITION EVENT - 3:00-5:00 p.m., Forest Club Room.
On behalf of Dean Bruce Bare and the CFR Workplace Quality Committee, faculty, students, and staff are invited to participate in the 2003 CFR Recognition Event honoring exemplary achievements by individuals and teams to support CFR goals, vision, and core values.

THURSDAY, 5 JUNE
URBAN ECOLOGY SEMINAR - 4:30 p.m., Anderson 223.
Rachel Kaplan, Professor of Natural Resources and Stephen Kaplan, Professor of Psychology, University of Michigan, "The Reasonable Person at the Urban/Forest Interface: Not Spoiling What One Came For."

THURSDAY, 5 JUNE
MONSTER SEMINAR JAM AT NWFSC - 11:00 a.m., NWFSC Auditorium
Jana Compton, National Health and Environmental Effects Laboratory, part of the US EPA, Covallis,OR, "From the Forest to the Sea (and Back Again): Salmon and Nutrients in the Oregon Coast Range." The NWFSC is located at 2725 Montlake Blvd East, right next to the Seattle Yacht Club, just south of the Montlake Bridge, on the west side of Montlake Blvd East. The auditorium is in between the east and west buildings.

THURSDAY, 5 JUNE
THESIS DEFENSE - Karen Black, 9:30 a.m., Anderson 22
" Recent Trends in North American Forest Product Exports to Japan"

FRIDAY, 6 JUNE
DEAD ELK EVENT, CUH
CFR Graduate Student Association extendS an invitation to all CFR faculty and staff to attend the final Dead Elk event of the academic year. Dead Elk will provide drinks, snacks, and "fixins" like buns,
ketchup, mustard, pickles, etc. We invite you to bring your own grillable materials. If you are so inclined to bring a dessert or salad to share, please do! Bring your family too! We are also requesting charcoal or other grills, if you have one and can bring it, please let us know. If you can bring a side dish, that would also be much appreciated. We also request lawn games like croquet, bocce, frisbee, and whatever else people can dig out of their basements or garages.

FRIDAY, 13 JUNE
CFR GRADUATION CEREMONY- 2:00-3:30 p.m., Kane 110.
A cake and punch reception will immediately follow in Anderson Lockwood Forest Club Room and Room 22.
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CONFERENCES
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TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY, 9-11 JUNE
ANNUAL WIND RIVER CANOPY CRANE SCIENCE CONFERENCE
All are welcome and encouraged to join in and learn about canopy research taking place at Wind River in the beautiful Columbia River Gorge. For an agenda, see http://depts.washington.edu/wrccrf/scicon/SciConAgenda.html

SUNDAY, MONDAY, TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY 15-18 JUNE
SECOND INTERNATIONAL PRECISION FORESTRY SYMPOSIUM, Kane and Anderson Halls. Hosted by the UW Precision Forestry Cooperative.
http://www.cfr.washington.edu/Outreach/PreFor/agenda2003.htm
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COMMUNITY AND OUTREACH
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SATURDAY, 7 JUNE
VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES AT KING COUNTY DNR - 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Remove invasive plants and maintain plantings at Cavanaugh Pond along the Cedar River near Renton. Contact Tina Miller at 206.296.299 or tina.miller@metrokc.gov. For additional volunteer opportunities with the King County DNR, go to http://dnr.metrokc.gov/wlr/PI/calendar.htm.

SATURDAY, 7 JUNE
" CELEBRATING WILDFLOWERS" SPECIAL EVENT - 9-3:30 p.m., Woodland Park Zoo,
near the butterfly exhibit.
Presented by CUH's Rare Care (Rare Plant Care and Conservation Program), the event will feature fun and educational activities for all ages, as well as displays by the Cascade Land Conservancy, King County Noxious Weed Control Program, Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest, The Nature
Conservancy, and the Washington Native Plant Society. Bring your children and give them the opportunity to be a pollinator, pet up to 17 different species of moss, go on a wildflower safari, or look at all sort of plant parts under a microscope! Contact Laura Zybas (lzybas@u.washington.edu) or Sarah Reichard (reichard@u.washington.edu) at CUH for more details.

SATURDAY, 21 JUNE
VOLUNTEER TRAINING IN RARE PLANT SEED COLLECTION
CUH's Rare Care will be training volunteers to collect seeds of rare plants for the new Miller Seed Vault. If you are interested in becoming a Rare Care volunteer, please contact Laura Zybas (lzybas@u.washington.edu) for more information.
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CFR FIELD FACILITIES, CENTERS AND RESEARCH GROUPS
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CENTER FOR URBAN HORTICULTURE
As students and faculty leave for summer field work, the staff at the Hyde Herbarium at the Center for Urban Horticulture remind you that it is important that the plant species you study have voucher specimens created and deposited at a herbarium. This verifies the species you worked on for the future. The Hyde Herbarium will also help you identify both native and non-native plants and will help graduate students with their keying skills. For instruction and supplies for creating voucher specimens, or for information on identification services, please contact Erikka Pearson at 685-2589 or epearson@u.washington.edu.


RURAL TECHNOLOGY INITIATIVE
RTI facilitated a meeting at CFR on May 20th, with 20 members of the Quinault Indian Nation Department of Natural Resources (QDNR), led by Forest Manager, Dawn Houle. The QDNR has approximately 100 employees that oversee natural resource activities on 216,000 acres of tribal forest
lands. Many of those attending are mid-career professionals interested in continuing education opportunities at CFR, while others have an interest in resource science educational opportunities at CFR for their children. After warm greetings from Dean Bruce Bare, the group was introduced to on-campus and distance learning opportunities at CFR by Associate Dean Steve West, UW Vice Provost for Educational Outreach Dave Szatmary, UW Admissions Specialist Robin Hennes, CFR Director of Student Services Michelle Trudeau, Program Manager of the Science and Tribes Educational Partnerships (STEP) Nan Little, Professor of American Indian Studies, Charlotte Cote, and RTI Project Coordinator Larry Mason.

On May 23rd, RTI led a faculty, staff, and student tour of Conrad Industries in Chehalis, WA, which operates two pyrolisis machines producing volatile gases, char, and bio-oil by heating hydrocarbon feed
stocks to very high temperatures in a vacuum where combustion cannot occur. RTI is working with Conrad Industries and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to develop projects to test the economic and environmental consequences of using wood biomass to produce clean energy.

On May 27, RTI Project Coordinator Larry Mason gave a guest lecture at Port Angeles's Peninsula College for a forest ecology class stand dynamics woods tour. After the field tour, he talked to students about opportunities to transfer to CFR after completion of an Associates Degree.


WIND RIVER CANOPY CRANE
Recent educational visits to the canopy crane included the ESC 320-520 class, led by Professor Jerry Franklin. Although the weather didn't cooperate, we trust that the class had a very valuable experience. Next up was Columbia River High School and Stevenson High School advanced biology class making their bi-annual trip to the research site. The week ended with a very special visit by a group of CFR alumni and supporters lead by Dean Bruce Bare, and Professor Jerry Franklin. That day ended with a group of CFR undergrads who finally had the weather cooperate for an educational lift!

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FORESTRY IN THE NEWS
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A recent article on forest fires in the west can be found at:
http://www.headwatersnews.org/HCN.fire03.html

For recent articles featuring CFR faculty, staff, students, and alumni, go to the CFR homepage for "CFR in the News: or use this link:
http://www.cfr.washington.edu/news_pubs/cfr_news.htm


WEBSITES FOR SEMINARS IN RELATED DEPARTMENTS

Applied Physics Laboratory
http://www.apl.washington.edu/Research/seminars.html

Aquatic & Fishery Sciences
http://www.fish.washington.edu/news/fishline/fishline.html

Atmospheric Sciences
http://www.atmos.washington.edu/cgi-bin/calendar.perl

Biology
http://www.biology.washington.edu/bio2/news/seminars/

Geological Sciences
http://www.geology.washington.edu

Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean (JISAO)
http://tao.atmos.washington.edu/seminars/

Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NFSC)
http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html

NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL)
http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/home/seminars/index.html

NOAA Fisheries Oceanography Coordinated Investigations (PMEL/FOCI)
http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/foci/seminar.html

Program on the Environment (POE)
http://depts.washington.edu/poeweb/happening/calendar.cgi

Quaternary Research Center (QRC)
http://depts.washington.edu/qrc/index.cgi


The Straight Grain
Volume 17, Number 3

In this Issue:

- Events
- Conferences
- Community and Outreach
- Centers & Field Sites
- Forestry Issues in the News
- General Announcements
- Administrative FYIs

23 May 2003

The STRAIGHT GRAIN is a weekly newsletter for the College of Forest Resources community. Please submit notices for THE STRAIGHT GRAIN to Patricia Gomez (pagomez@u.washington.edu), by 10:30 a.m. Thursdays. Check out the CFR Event calendar at http://www.cfr.washington.edu/Outreach/cfrevent/cfrevent.htm for seminars, conferences, and other events.

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EVENTS

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MONDAY, 26 MAY
-MEMORIAL DAY-

TUESDAY, 27 MAY
- SEMINAR – Center for Water & Watershed Studies, 8:30 a.m. – 9:20 a.m., Anderson 22. “Origins of Puget Sound’s river landscape.” Brian Collins, research scientist, Department of Earth & Space Sciences, UW.

TUESDAY, 27 MAY
- SEMINAR – Monster Seminar Jam, 11:00 a.m., NWFSC Auditorium. “Moving Toward Ecological Sustainability in Water Management." Dr. Brian D. Richter, Director of the Freshwater Initiative at The Nature Conservancy. For more information, contact Ashley Steel at (206) 860-3406.

TUESDAY, 27 MAY
- SEMINAR - Robert Van Dyk, Pacific University, noon – 1:30 p.m., Gowen Hall 1B. "Power, History, and Structure Based Management in Oregon's State Forest, Or What I Found in the Oregon Department of Forestry's Filing Cabinets and Spatial Data."

TUESDAY, 27 MAY
- SEMINAR – Heather Price, 3:30 p.m., ATG 610. "Long range transport of air pollution from Eurasia: calculating OH and dilution factors." Ms. Price is a candidate for a postdoctoral research position with the Program on Climate Change. For more information, contact Miriam Bertram, at 206-543-6521.

WEDNESDAY, 28 MAY
-THESIS DEFENSE – Brian Zweibel, 9:00 a.m., Anderson 22. "Human Distribution on the Alagnak Wild River."

THURSDAY, 29 MAY
- THESIS DEFENSE - Crystal Raymond, 1:00 p.m., Winkenwerder 105. “The effect of pre-fire fuel conditions on fire severity and intensity in the Biscuit fire of southwestern Oregon.”

MONDAY, 2 JUNE
- THESIS DEFENSE – Tara Goldsmith, 3:00 p.m., Douglas Classroom, CUH. "Factors affecting population growth and persistence of Wenatchee Mts. checker-mallow (Sidalcea oregana var. calva), a taxon endemic to Chelan County, WA."

WEDNESDAY, 4 JUNE
- THESIS DEFENSE – Heather Rogers, 9:00 a.m., Winkenwerder 107. “Investigation of alternative fuel removal strategies.”

WEDNESDAY, 4 JUNE
CFR 2003 Recognition Event - 3:00 – 5:00 p.m., Forest Club Room.

On behalf of Dean Bruce Bare and the CFR Workplace Quality Committee, faculty, students, and staff are invited to participate in the 2003 CFR Recognition Event honoring exemplary achievements by individuals and teams to support CFR goals, vision, and core values.

SATURDAY, 7 JUNE
--VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES AT KING COUNTY DNR – 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Remove invasive plants and maintain plantings at Cavanaugh Pond along the Cedar River near Renton. Contact Tina Miller at 206.296.299 or tina.miller@metrokc.gov. For additional volunteer opportunities with the King County DNR, go to http://dnr.metrokc.gov/wlr/PI/calendar.htm.

FRIDAY, 13 JUNE
--CFR GRADUATION CEREMONY—Graduation ceremony will take place 2:00 – 3:30 p.m., Kane Hall 110. A cake and punch reception will immediately follow in Anderson Hall Forest Club Room and Room 22.

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CFR FIELD FACILITIES, RESEARCH CENTERS AND GROUPS

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FORESTRY IN THE NEWS

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For recent articles featuring CFR faculty, staff, students, and alumni, go to the CFR homepage for “CFR in the News: or use this link: http://www.cfr.washington.edu/news_pubs/cfr_news.htm

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GENERAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

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*****************CFR NEWSLETTER GETS NEW LOOK ***************************

The CFR newsletter has a brand new look and format from previous years. In case you haven't seen it, check out the new College newsletter at:

http://www.cfr.washington.edu/news_pubs/CFRNL/03-Spring.pdf

Kudos to Cecilia Paul, Director of Communications, for a fantastic job revamping the newsletter!!

*****Forestry Resources Librarian attends forest research meeting in Austria *****

Carol Green spent May 1-12, 2003 in Vienna and nearby Laxenburg, Austria attending a meeting of the International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO) Task Force on Information Technology and the Forest Sector. The meeting was held at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in Laxenburg. Carol attended as a representative from Unit 6.03, Information Services and Knowledge Organization, for which she serves as coordinator. IIASA is housed in the former summer palace (Schloss) of the Hapsburgs, the ruling family of Austria until 1918.

The purpose of the meeting was to outline a book forecasting how information technology will change the forest products industry in the future. Carol will co-author an introductory chapter illustrating how unexpected innovations, such as the internet, have changed forecasts in the past, and, therefore, might also have an unforeseen effect in the future. The book is scheduled to be published in time for the IUFRO World Congress in 2005 which will be held in Brisbane, Australia. Carol also visited the IUFRO Secretariat in Vienna and consulted on several information projects including the International Directory of Forest Information Services.

************** GARB DAY A SUCCESS DESPITE SOGGY WEATHER **********

Garb Day this year was very wet. There was a lot of hail, even more rain, and the occasional thunder roar. The bad weather prevented a lot of people from coming out to enjoy Garb Day, but 60 people braved the rain to participate. The usual events took place, such as a Logger Sports demonstration, a blue grass band, and a BBQ salmon dinner. The Logger Sports team demonstrated sawing, chopping, and pole climbing. Spectators then had the opportunity to try these events-it's not always as easy as it looks! It was too wet to bring out the tug-of-war rope and play volleyball, so most people stood around the bonfire or sat around in Pack Hall enjoying the camaraderie of Garb Day.

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JOB OPENING

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The Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs are seeking qualified candidates for a professional forester position in Central Oregon. The position is responsible for inventory on over 440,000 acres of highly diverse forestland. Requires a bachelor's degree in forestry and at least three years experience conducting stand exams in the Northwest. Must possess excellent computer skills and experience with databases and GIS. The successful candidate will be a self-starter, highly motivated, and committed to excellence. Starting salary: High thirties to mid-forties plus benefits DOE. Send resume and cover letter to Personnel Department, P.O. Box C, Warm Springs, OR 97761.

Allan D. Derickson, CF
Forest Planner
Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, Oregon
541 553-2416 ext. 239

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WEBSITES FOR SEMINARS IN RELATED DEPARTMENTS

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Applied Physics Laboratory
http://www.apl.washington.edu/Research/seminars.html

Aquatic & Fishery Sciences
http://www.fish.washington.edu/news/fishline/fishline.html

Atmospheric Sciences
http://www.atmos.washington.edu/cgi-bin/calendar.perl

Center for Water and Watershed Studies (CWWS)
http://depts.washington.edu/cwws/Outreach/informationtransfer.html

Geological Sciences
http://www.geology.washington.edu

Join Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean (JISAO)
http://tao.atmos.washington.edu/seminars/

Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NFSC)
http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/seminars/index.html

NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL)
http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/home/seminars/index.html

NOAA Fisheries Oceanography Coordinated Investigations (PMEL/FOCI)
http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/foci/seminar.html

Program on the Environment (POE)
http://depts.washington.edu/poeweb/happening/calendar.cgi

Quaternary Research Center (QRC)
http://depts.washington.edu/qrc/index.cgi

Urban Ecology
http://www.cfr.washington.edu/research.urbaneco/SeminarSeries/seminar_index.htm


The Straight Grain
Volume 17, Number 1

In this Issue:
- Events
- Conferences
- Community and Outreach
- Centers & Field Sites
- Forestry Issues in the News
- General Announcements
- Administrative FYIs

12, May 2003

The STRAIGHT GRAIN is a weekly newsletter for the College of Forest Resources community. Please submit notices for THE STRAIGHT GRAIN to Patricia Gomez (pagomez@u.washington.edu), by 10:30 a.m. Thursdays. Check out the CFR Event calendar at http://www.cfr.washington.edu/Outreach/cfrevent/cfrevent.htm for seminars, conferences, and other events.
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EVENTS

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THURSDAY, 15 MAY

PROHORT Series: Classes for Professionals in the Horticulture and Urban Forestry Industry:

“Common Root Rots in the Pacific Northwest: Recognition, Cultural, Biological and Chemical Controls.” Dr. Olaf Ribeiro, Plant Pathologist, 8:30 a.m. to noon, NHS Hall, CUH. $35 fee; pre-registration required.

SATURDAY, 17 MAY

GARB DAY 2003

Spring is well underway, and that signals the UW Forest Club's annual Garb Day event. This is a time for the CFR community to gather together at Pack Forest for a full day of entertainment. It's meant for students, faculty, staff, alumni, family, and friends. The activities that take place throughout the day are for spectators and participants alike, with equipment and instruction provided. After a full day of logging sports and other activities, a salmon barbeque feast will be served. Join in the fun this year. For more information on this CFR tradition go to http://www.ruraltech.org/events/garbday/index.asp

THURSDAY, 22 MAY

Program on Climate Change Annual Public Lecture -- Kane Hall, 120, 7 p.m.

"Global Changes, Local Impacts: Consequences of Natural and Human-Caused Climate Change for Life in the Pacific Northwest." Dr. Nathan Mantua, Research Scientist, Climate Impacts Group, Affiliate Assistant Professor, Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences and School of Marine Affairs, University of Washington.

THURSDAY, 29 MAY

--DISSERTATION DEFENSE-- Susan Prichard, 9:30 a.m., Winkenwerder 107. "Spatial and temporal dynamics of fire and vegetation in Thunder Creek Watershed, North Cascades National Park."

THURSDAY, 29 MAY

Thirty-Fourth Annual Conference of the Washington Pulp & Paper Foundation. The luncheon and business meeting will be at noon in the Forest Club Room, followed by papermaking and coating lab demonstrations, a student poster session, and senior research presentations. The reception and banquet will be held in the Faculty Club starting at 6:00 p.m. The featured banquet speaker is Mr. George J. Harad, Chairman of the Board and CEO, Boise Cascade Corporation. For more information and to register for the conference, please contact Heather Laurence at wppf@u.washington.edu.

SATURDAY, 7 JUNE

--VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES AT KING COUNTY DNR – 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Remove invasive plants and maintain plantings at Cavanaugh Pond along the Cedar River near Renton. Contact Tina Miller at 206.296.299 or tina.miller@metrokc.gov. For additional volunteer opportunities with the King County DNR, go to http://dnr.metrokc.gov/wlr/PI/calendar.htm.

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CFR FIELD FACILITIES, RESEARCH CENTERS AND GROUPS

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WIND RIVER CANOPY CRANE

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***Wind River Canopy Crane in full swing with educational programs****

Crane facility visits in early May included, University of North Brunswick, the Biology Club from WSU-Vancouver, North Cascade Institute, the University of Toronto, and to finish out the out the first full week of May, the Marylhurst Community College from Portland, Oregon made their annual visit to Wind River.

--Weather conditions at WRCCRF—

Microclimate at the WRCCRF for April 2003 warmer and dryer than was typical between 1978 and 2001. Average air temperature was 6.43 C. Long-term average is 5.1 C (stdev 1.30). Total precipitation was 175.87 mm. Long-term averagE is 224.7 (stdev 103.1).

Even though this is a "weak" El Nino year, current trend in microclimate at the WRCCRF is following a pattern similar to past El Nino events. If this trend continues, summer may be quite dry and hot; however, fall rain may start early (August) and possibly be heavy.

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FORESTRY IN THE NEWS
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**********ECOLOGISTS’ NEW LAB: THE ASPHALT JUNGLE*******************

Most wildlife biologists choose to work in wilderness areas and other pristine getaways. Not so John Marzluff. A professor at the University of Washington at Seattle, Dr. Marzluff spends his time chasing crows across the green lawns of the city's subdivisions. Marzluff and his students are studying the behavior of these urban crows and other birds, figuring out how each species gets by. By sharing this data with local planners, they hope to preserve Seattle's disappearing biodiversity. (05/06/03) Christian Science Monitor

http://www.csmonitor.com/2003/0506/p14s01-lehl.html

For recent articles featuring CFR faculty, staff, studens, and alumni, go to the CFR homepage for “CFR in the News: or use this link: http://www.cfr.washington.edu/news_pubs/cfr_news.htm

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GENERAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

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--Facilities / Scheduling Updates—

There is a new and improved location on the CFR website for facilities information. http://www.cfr.washington.edu/Facilities/And22-2003/May2003.htm will give you the most recent availability in Anderson 22 and The Forest Club Room (Anderson 207). In addition, you will find a link titled “Meeting / Conference Rooms and Contacts.” When looking for a space for your meeting or event, this is a good resource. Please bookmark it for future reference.

--Need more information on UW disabilities services?--

The UW, Disability Services Office, has an "Access Guide for Persons with Disabilities" and a "Campus Mobility Route Map" which give information regarding physical accessibility to buildings on the Seattle campus. The guide and the map are on the web at http://www.washington.edu/admin/ada/.

A hard copy of this information will be kept at the reference station in the Dean's office. If you require a copy, you can request one at the ADA website.

*************CFR GOES OUT TO CHEER MARINERS TO VICTORY**************

Thursday, April 24th CFR students and friends watched as the Mariners beat the Cleveland Indians 4 -2. The outing to SAFECO field attracted more than 80 staff and students from the College of Forest Resources. It was a great night out!

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STUDENT ANNOUNCEMENTS

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Over the weekend of April 26th and 27th, the UW Logger Sports team took FIRST PLACE in a competition hosted by the University of Montana. With 211 points, the team won with 60 points more than the second place team from Flathead Community College. The team won another Stihl chainsaw. Throughout the season, the UW team struggled to out-do the Flathead team, and they finally did this weekend! Every member of the team placed in at least two events, so if you see them, be sure to congratulate them! WAY TO GO DAWGS!

Anny Schmidt -- 1st place Pole Climb, 2nd place Birling, 2nd place Vertical Speed Chop, 2nd place Horizontal Speed Chop, 4th place Pulp Toss (partner: Dave Sund), 1st place Caber Toss.

Alicia Sullivan -- 2nd place Double Buck (partner: Jen Holt), 3rd place Single Buck, 4th place Axe Throw, 6th place Horizontal Hard Chop.

Sara Finneseth -- 1st place Single Buck, 1st place Double Buck (partner: Stephanie Short of Evergreen State College), 1st place Vertical Hard Hit, 3rd place Pulp Toss (partner: Ben Arstad), 3rd place Caber Toss.

Jen Holt -- 2nd place Double Buck (partner: Alicia Sullivan), 5th place Horizontal Hard Chop.

Ben Arstad -- 3rd place Pulp Toss (partner: Sara Finneseth), 6th place Power Saw, 6th place Double Buck (partner: Dave Sund), 5th place Axe Throw.

Dave Sund -- 1st place Axe Throw, 2nd place Choker Race, 4th place Pulp Toss (partner: Anny Schmidt), 6th place Double Buck (partner: Ben Arstad).

The team also has two members who attend Evergreen State College. Since that college doesn't have a team, they are allowed to compete with the school closest to them. Ray Gleason and Stephanie Short, of Evergreen State College also won several events, such as 1st place in Jack and Jill (double buck).

CONGRATULATIONS UW LOGGER TEAM!!

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FACULTY ANNOUNCEMENTS
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***Professor Rob Harrison sends a report from his sabbatical in Botucatu, Brazil***

Rob Harrison and family send a report from Botucatu, Brazil. Rob, wife Marcia, son Joseph and daughter Joanna, arrived intact on the same day the war started in Iraq. So much for timing! Having been under military rule until 1985, but transitioning to civilian rule peacefully, Brazilians have mixed feelings and are quick to want to talk about the US/Iraqi conflict. Most Brazilians Rob's age have stories to tell about teachers and friends of their parents that suddenly disappeared during the worst of the military rule in the 1970's. Brazil is firmly entrenched in Democracy now, so much so, that there are large blocks of time during campaigns where there is nothing but political advertisements on the television. With dozens of political parties, most take advantage of the free advertising. Most Brazilians plan something else during that time and "switch off". Political apathy is likely a common human condition.

When Rob was last in Brazil (1996), the dollar was about on par with the real (plural reis; the unit of Brazilian currency). It now stands at about 3.2 reis per dollar, so things are pretty cheap, including cars...at least in dollars. A nice new car would be about 20,000 reis or $6,000. Botucatu is a medium-sized University town (about 50,000) and everything is remote from most everything else for us (our kid's school, where we live, where we work). Thus the need for the car. Fortunately, Brazilians mostly drive on the right hand side of the road, except for roads in bad shape, and in which case they sometimes drive on the "best" side of the road. However, the "white knuckle" factor in Brazil is far less then in, say, France, and doesn't even approach that of some other South American countries.

Personal cars are typically powered by alcohol in Brazil, and the price of alcohol is about 40% cheaper than gasoline right now at the stations. The exhaust smells like a mixed drink, and apparently emissions are very low. Alcohol is produced from the sugar cane industry in Brazil, whereas it is produced primarily from corn in the US. Obviously, there are vast areas of the Brazilian landscape devoted to growing sugar cane. Sugar is also a primary export from Brazil.

Since Rob's last sabbatical, the forestry situation has changed pretty dramatically in Brazil. Brazil topped 10 million hectares (about 25 million acres) of planted forest. It was clear that the very profitable pulp industry, based on Eucalyptus, was growing fast, and acreages that had been formerly planted in pine were being rapidly replaced, with large new areas of former degraded ranch land also being planted to Eucaluptus. Only about 60,000 hectares remains in pine species. All along, most timber was cut from native forests, primarily the Amazon region, and shipped to the more populous regions of south and southeast Brazil.

Due to the supply of timber not meeting demand, Brazil is now starting to experience an old-fashioned timber shortage. Right now, that shortage of material is starting to be made up by importing plantation-grown pine from Chile, Argentina, and other countries. Sound familiar?

Rob is working on a proposal that includes sending students to the US from Brazil to study forestry at US Universities (primarily UW and Georgia), and to send US students to Brazil to learn about Brazilian forestry. More on that later. Research studies include long-term forest productivity, establishment of semi-native forests on degraded rangelands, and utilization of organic waste, particularly pulp and paper mill waste and biosolids.

If any of you would be interested, this is a really beautiful place to spend a sabbatical smack in the "mata atlantica" region of Brazil, and the University here is anxious to receive visitors. The level of forest management can be quite intensive, and the large number of existing plantation and natural forests give a lot of opportunity for research. There are two major mills (Eucatex and Duratex) within 20 km of Botucatu.

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WEBSITES FOR SEMINARS IN RELATED DEPARTMENTS

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Applied Physics Laboratory

http://www.apl.washington.edu/Research/seminars.html

Aquatic & Fishery Sciences

http://www.fish.washington.edu/news/fishline/fishline.html

Atmospheric Sciences

http://www.atmos.washington.edu/cgi-bin/calendar.perl

Geological Sciences

http://www.geology.washington.edu

Join Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean (JISAO)

http://tao.atmos.washington.edu/seminars/

NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL)

http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/home/seminars/index.html

NOAA Fisheries Oceanography Coordinated Investigations (PMEL/FOCI)

http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/foci/seminar.html

Quaternary Research Center (QRC)

http://depts.washington.edu/qrc/index.cgi


cfr.washington.edu